Tuesday, November 22, 2016

We May Be At A Tipping Point

‘Jump’ In Global Warming Now Appears ‘Imminent’

90% of the heat in the atmosphere is absorbed in the oceans.  There are two important processes passing that heat back and forth into the atmosphere, the "ENSO", i.e., La Nina and El Nino, and the "Pacific Decadal Oscillation "PDO".  Each of these raise and lower temperatures over the oceans and can have impact on weather over the entire planet.  Historically, they both rise and fall every few years, the PDO in decades, lifting and dropping atmospheric temperatures.  But now with
global warming it's more a stair case, each implementation of ENSO, El Nino raises the temperatures more than the last time, and La Nina lowers it less.  The same with the PDO.  We are now in a decadal PDO increase in ocean temperatures meaning the next ten years are going to get very warm.  Our current La Nina will keep it abated somewhat, but another El Nino will follow in a few years and all of our record heat temperatures will be significantly broken.  The next ten years are portends to be unlike any we've ever experiences.

We may be witnessing the start of the long-awaited jump in global temperatures. There is “a vast and growing body of research,” as Climate Central explained in February. “Humanity is about to experience a historically unprecedented spike in temperatures.”
Antarctica appears to have set its all-time temperature record — 63.5°F (17.5°C) — on March 24 at the northern tip of the Antarctic Peninsula. That is “more than 30°F (17°C) above average.” This was actually part of a heat wave since the Antarctic record it broke was set the day before (63.3°F). Also in March, the Chilean desert was deluged by “over fourteen years of rain in one day.”
It was the hottest February on record in California, a full 1°F higher than the second-warmest February on record. And that followed California’s driest January ever recorded. These type of records are not good news.
It affecting the poles as well
A March study, “Near-term acceleration in the rate of temperature change,” makes clear that an actual acceleration in the rate of global warming is imminent — with Arctic warming rising a stunning 1°F per decade by the 2020s.
and
Antarctica appears to have set its all-time temperature record — 63.5°F (17.5°C) — on March 24 at the northern tip of the Antarctic Peninsula. That is “more than 30°F (17°C) above average.” This was actually part of a heat wave since the Antarctic record it broke was set the day before (63.3°F). Also in March, the Chilean desert was deluged by “over fourteen years of rain in one day.”

Rate Of Climate Change To Soar By 2020s, With Arctic Warming 1°F Per Decade

The authors warned that, by 2020, human-caused warming will move the Earth’s climate system into a regime of rapid multi-decadal rates of warming. It projected that within the next few years, “there is an increased likelihood of accelerated global warming associated with release of heat from the sub-surface ocean and a reversal of the phase of decadal variability in the Pacific Ocean.”